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Table of Contents

Table of Contents

January 20, 2014 13:022 comments

This page will be subject to revision as I write and reorganize new topics. If you have suggestions for new topics, feel free to add them in the comments!


Introduction

A brief history of radiation (Part 1) (Part 2)

Atoms and elements

Units and notation

What is radiation?

Radioactive decay

Radiation detection

Nuclear energy

Nuclear reactions

Fission reactor

Fusion reactor

The future of nuclear energy

Nuclear fuel cycle

Mining

Enrichment

Fabrication

Spent fuel reprocessing

Disposal

Radiation applications

Medical applications

Industrial applications

Nuclear weapons

Health effects of radiation

Mechanisms of action

Deterministic effects

Stochastic effects

Principles of radiation protection

Units of exposure

Radiation safety

Exposure limits

Nuclear accidents

Three Mile Island

Chernobyl

Fukushima

Issues and policy

Nonproliferation

Nuclear security

Nuclear waste

Myths, misconceptions, and misinformation

An introduction to critical thinking

2 Comments

  • Yay for the Three M’s! But I would also like to see a section on movies or books that you would recommend that deal with the subject in either a non-fiction or particularly a fictional genre. And your reviews of them. Thank you!

    • Nearly all of my reference materials are textbooks from my university classes, but I think most people would have trouble understanding them unless they already have a background in university-level mathematics (at least through calculus), chemistry, and physics. I heard there was a nuclear documentary that came out last year called Pandora’s Promise, but I haven’t seen it yet, so I can’t review or recommend it. However, there are a lot of inaccuracies about radiation and nuclear power in many movies (lots of superhero movies, The China Syndrome, etc.) and it might be fun to go through them in detail and compare the movies’ claims with reality. But I would like to leave that until after I cover more of the basic science so that readers can have some background context before evaluating specific claims in detail. Thanks for your comment!

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